what language is spoken in poland

Do You Know What Language Polish People Speak?

(Last Updated On: June 13, 2022)

What Language Polish People Speak

What language do Polish people speak? Do you know? Many people will answer Polish, but there are several languages spoken in Poland, each with its dialects and pronunciations! This article will teach you everything you need to know about the languages of Poland so that the next time someone asks you what language Polish people speak; you’ll be able to tell them!

The languages in Poland

Apart from English, many tourists are surprised when they come to Poland and realize that we have our language, too. There are two official languages in Poland: Polish and Silesian. While most Poles can speak both of them fluently, some choose one or another depending on where they live or who they’re talking to.

The Western Dialects

Here is a brief rundown of these western dialects: Silesian, Cieszyn Silesian, Lach, and Moravian Wallach. The last three are mutually intelligible between themselves and Czech and Slovak. They were once considered dialects of Czech or Slovak (or both) but have been recognized as distinct languages since 1746. They are spoken by about 2 million people in Poland and Slovakia today (about 1 million in Poland). The best known Western dialect is Silesian, an official language in Prussia until 1945.

Cieszyn Silesian Dialect

In addition to speaking standard Polish, many Poles also speak Cieszyn Silesian in various areas of three provinces (Czech-majority provinces of Moravia and Silesia). Though generally mutually intelligible with Czech, many words are borrowed from German or a mixture of both languages. The dialect has been recognized by UNESCO as an endangered minority language and has been taught in schools since 2005. But if you’re visiting Poland, locals would recommend learning standard Polish instead.

languages in poland
language of poland

Lesser-Known Languages Spoken in Poland

There are many languages spoken in Poland, but by far, most of them fall into two main categories: Indo-European and Uralic. Here is a look at each type and some interesting facts about these lesser-known languages spoken in Poland. The first language groups are Germanic (including English) and Slavic (including Russian).

In Polish, ‘szkoła’ means school, which comes from an old German word for school called ‘Schule.’ This shows how much Germany has had on Poland over time because Germans also settled in northern parts of Poland before WW2. The second largest group is Slavic languages. Russian is spoken by about 1 million Poles (about 2% of Poland’s population).

The other Slavic languages are Ukrainian and Belarusian. Ukrainians make up about 0.5% of Poland’s population, while Belarusians make up 0.3%. The next group is Finno-Ugric languages, which include Finnish and Estonian. There are more than 100,000 speakers of these languages living in Poland. They account for only 0.1% of all Poles. Still, they have a powerful presence in western regions like Greater Poland Voivodeship and Pomeranian Voivodeship due to historical reasons such as border shifts at some time. Do you want to know what languages do people of Estonia speak?

Officially Recognized Minority Languages Of Poland

Poland is home to several officially recognized minority languages, including German, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Lithuanian, and Russian. These languages are protected by the Polish Constitution and are used in various official contexts, such as education, media, and government.

German is the most widely spoken minority language in Poland, with over six hundred thousand speakers. German has been officially recognized by the Polish government since the early 1990s and is used in several official contexts, such as education and media. So to be monolingual, as many native English speakers are, is to be in the minority and perhaps miss out.

Ukrainian is another minority language with a long history in Poland. It was first recognized in the early twentieth century, but its use has declined in recent years. Nevertheless, Ukrainian is still used in some official contexts, such as in education and government.

Belarusian, Lithuanian, and Russian are also minority languages with a long history in Poland. These languages were first recognized in the early twentieth century, but their use has declined in recent years. Nevertheless, they are still used in some official contexts, such as education and government.

What language do you speak if your Polish isn't good enough for school?

If your Polish is not good enough for school, you will need to learn another language. There are many different languages that you could choose from. Some of these include English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

What language is Polish most closely related to?

Polish is the official language of Poland, but it’s also spoken in other countries. It belongs to the West Slavic group and has a lot of similarities with Czech, Slovak, Slovenian, Croatian, Bosnian, Macedonian, and Montenegrin.

How long does it take to become fluent in Polish?

It depends on how much time you spend learning Polish. If you only study Polish at school, it may take several years before you reach fluency. If you want to improve your Polish quickly, you should try speaking Polish every day. This way, you’ll get better faster!

How many languages do they speak in Poland?

Poland is a country with more than 40 different official and minority languages. The most spoken language in the country is Polish, which has about 80 million native speakers. Other significant languages include German (about 6 million), Russian (5 million), Belarusian (2 million), Ukrainian (1.7 million), Czech (1.6 million), Hungarian (1.4 million), Slovak (1.3 million), Lithuanian (800 thousand), Yiddish (300 thousand).

What is the origin of the Polish language?

The Polish language has its roots in several different languages, and it is impossible to pinpoint an exact date when the first words were spoken. However, there are some theories about the origins of the Polish language that have been put forward over the years. One theory suggests that the Polish language originated in the 9th century, while another claims it was created around the year 1000.

Unofficially Recognized Minority Languages Of Poland

Poland is home to several unofficial minority languages, including Kashubian, Silesian, and Romani. These native languages are not recognized by the Polish government, but they are nonetheless spoken by many Polish people. There are several reasons why these languages are not recognized by the government.

First, the Polish government has only recently begun to recognize minority languages, and it has not yet caught up to the rest of Europe in this regard. Second, the number of speakers of these languages is relatively small, and the Polish government may not see the need to recognize them. Finally, the Polish government may be reluctant to admit these languages because they are not used in formal settings and are not well-documented.

Even though these languages are not recognized by the government, they are still crucial to those who speak them. These languages are a part of the cultural heritage of Poland, and they are an essential part of the identity of the people who speak them.

poland language spoken

Kashubian

One of the essential unofficial minority languages of Poland is Kashubian. Kashubian is spoken by a minority of people in the Polish region of Kashubia. Kashubian is a Slavic additional language, and it is closely related to Polish. However, Kashubian is not mutually intelligible with Polish.

Kashubian has several unique features. For example, Kashubian has a complex system of grammatical gender, with three genders (masculine, feminine, and neuter) and two numbers (singular and plural). Kashubian also has several dialects, divided into two groups: northern and southern.

The Kashubian language is essential to the Kashubian people. Kashubian is used in everyday life, and it is an integral part of the Kashubian identity. The Kashubian language is also used in some schools and some media.

language in poland

Silesian

Another important unofficial minority language of Poland is Silesian. Silesian is spoken by a minority of people in the Polish region of Silesia. Silesian is a Slavic language, and it is closely related to Polish. However, Silesian is not mutually intelligible with Polish.

Silesian has several unique features. For example, Silesian has a complex system of grammatical gender, with three genders (masculine, feminine, and neuter) and two numbers (singular and plural). Silesian also has several dialects, divided into two groups: northern and southern.

The Silesian language is essential to the Silesian people. Silesian is used in everyday life, and it is an integral part of the Silesian identity. The Silesian language is also used in some schools and some media.

Romani

Another important unofficial minority language of Poland is Romani. Romani is spoken by a minority of people in Poland. Romani is a member of the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European language family. Romani is closely related to Hindi and Punjabi.

Romani has several unique features. For example, Romani has a complex system of grammatical gender, with three genders (masculine, feminine, and neuter) and two numbers (singular and plural). Romani also has several dialects, divided into two groups: northern and southern.

The Romani language is essential to the Romani people. Romani is used in everyday life, and it is an integral part of the Romani identity. The Romani language is also used in some schools and some media.

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